Leach Field Repair

Leach Field RepairSeptic tanks serve a purpose that is not always apparent to those who live in highly populated or densely populated areas. Neighborhoods and homes that are located in these areas often have the benefits of sewer systems that are able to flush away and eliminate any waste water. But what about homes that are in less populated regions, or don’t live in a part of a town or city that offers a sewer line connection to their home or property? This is where septic tanks come into play; a homeowner with a septic tank, however, needs to be aware of some septic problems that may crop up, especially if regular maintenance and check-ups are not performed.

A septic tank system is generally designed to drain into a leach field. The maintenance and upkeep of the septic tank, as well as what you put down your drain, impacts the overall health of a septic system and leach field. When you eventually run into an issue with the leach field, there can be a number of issues. Some of the symptoms that will let you know a leach field are failing are:

  • Strong odors emanating from either the septic tank or the drain field region
  • Reluctance for water to flush normally, as well as noises coming from different pipes throughout the home
  • Standing water or wet spots located in and around the leach field
  • The toilet, shower or sinks backing up with water

Now while these are the symptoms, we still need to discuss what could actually be causing the leach field problem in the first place:

  • Bio-mat building and sludge build up
  • Lack of consistent septic tank cleanings
  • Broken drainfield pipes or soil that has compacted too much
  • Overuse of the septic system
  • Roots of trees that can get into the important elements of the septic system

So how is a leach field problem then fixed? There is no “quick-fix” unfortunately, but the good news is that by process of elimination and with the help of a septic repair company that has years of industry knowledge, it can be diagnosed with ease. One of the first methods one can employ is actually prevention: preventing this from happening in the first place by getting septic tank draining on a regular basis, having your system checked at least once a year by a professional and determining your needs based on your system usage. A next step is to check if there is a clog in the system somewhere, either in the drainpipe that leads to the field, or something further up the line that could be causing the system to become overloaded.

Sometimes it requires a new trench system to replace the current one so that it drains better and more efficiently, or you may even need a septic tank replacement. Other times, you will find that it is a quick and simple fix. Ultimately, it depends on the nature of your particular septic tank setup and how your lawn is set up.

Contact your local septic system repair team today!